Light Come Shining

bob

Light Come Shining
The Transformations of Bob Dylan
By Andrew McCarron
Oxford University Press – £14.49

The minute you try to grab hold of Dylan, he’s no longer where he was. He’s like a flame: If you try to hold him in your hand you’ll surely get burned. Dylan’s life of change and constant disappearances and constant transformations makes you yearn to hold him, and to nail him down.

         (‘Masked and Anonymous’)

To say that Bob Dylan has always been obsessed with death and disintegration (both personal and global) would be an understatement.

          (‘World Gone Wrong’)

I’ve published a number of Bob Dylan book reviews on this site – he even has his own section – but I have to say, this is one of the most compelling and captivating books on the artist I’ve read in quite a while. Apart from the fact that the author, Andrew McCarron, delves right into the psychological nitty-gritty of what the sub-title suggests nigh immediately, he bequeaths the reader with numerous substantial examples throughout.

In so doing, he manages to shed quintessentially quizzical light on a mesmerising subject that remains intrinsically restless to say the least.

And it is this inexorable restlessness, this transient manoeuvre of almost obsessive musicality by one of the finest living artists on the planet today, which is the (most readable) bedrock of Light Come Shining – The Transformations of Bob Dylan.

Even the book’s Prologue (‘A Case for this Psychobiography’) opens with a most apt quote from T.S. Eliot:

And not the lifetime of one man only
But of old stones that cannot be deciphered

before going on to continue with a quotation from the personality psychologist, Henry Murray: ”[…] we are all in some respects like all other people, like some other people, and like no other people (Murray & Kluckhohn, 1953). Psychobiography tackles this last piece, the part of a person that’s unique and that may resist easy intelligibility. It asks why someone is the way he or she is – then draws on psychological theory and experimental research to address the question.”

Indeed, the numerous morph-like transformations of Bob Dylan are addressed relentlessly throughout these six, jam-packed, and very intelligently written, beguiling chapters.

As Michael J. Gilmour, author of The Gospel According to Bob Dylan: The Old, Old Story for Modern Times has since written: ”Light Come Shining is an intriguing complement to the biographical works of Robert Shelton, Clinton Heylin, and Howard Souness. The aim of McCarron’s psycho-biography is a glimpse into Dylan’s ‘inner life,’ and is a project sure to generate reactions among fans and academics alike. Reconstructing the artist from the art is always a perilous task but even those wary of such efforts will find much here to enjoy.”

‘Enjoy,’ is suffice to say, an exceedingly good descriptive word to use in relation to Light Come Shining. It might partially explain why I read it in a mere two sittings. For in wanting to find-out as it were, I inadvertently deciphered more and more and erm, more, without really knowing I was doing so.

So much so, that by the book’s end on page 193, I found myself beholding many a proclamation according to ye Minnesota Bard of open-ended discovery and redemption.
Not to mention a whole lot more besides.

An altogether terrific book.

David Marx

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One response to “Light Come Shining

  1. This might be something for me to read. I read Bob Dylan’s memoirs and I have was so disappointed 😞

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